Introducing Compex Wireless USA

Introducing the first FDA-cleared wireless electric muscle stimulation device designed to enhance performance and speed recovery. For over 20 years Compex has been the global leader in electrotherapy, with products beneficial for muscle recovery, injury prevention and intense training programs. Now with the release of the Compex Wireless USA athletes can experience freedom from wires which raises the training experience and allows athletes to take their workout to the next level.

Professional athletes of all sports from running, functional-fitness and cycling, to basketball and football can integrate Wireless USA into their daily training routines to achieve peak performance and desired results.

From fast recovery to muscle-strength gains and endurance improvements, the use of Wireless USA provides athletes and fitness enthusiasts with an intelligent tool to supercharge their performance and prevent future injuries. The device recruits specific motor nerves by targeting muscle fibers that cannot be reached through traditional workouts and training.

“Compex has been a key tool to enhance my performance since I started training,” said Josh Bridges, 2014 CrossFit Games Competitor. “It allows me to activate all my muscle fibers, dig deeper and ultimately get stronger for competition day. With the introduction of Wireless USA, I’m now able to have more freedom and increase the usage of NMES in my training.”

Additional Compex enthusiasts include: Chad Mendes (UFC), Steve Weatherford (NFL), Andy Potts (Ironman), John Wellborn (Strength Coach), among others.

 

World Champion Triathlete Timothy O’Donnell credits Compex muscle stimulation for recovery during training

Training for a triathlon is no easy feat and there are many elements that come into play when you’re working to become the best athlete possible. World champ triathlete, Timothy O’Donnell recently spoke to Outside Magazine about how he prepares for these strenuous races and credits Compex’s portable electrical stimulation machines during training.

“I have a lot of calf issues,” O’Donnell says in the magazine article. “When they get tight, I hook up the machine and it sends electrical pulses into the muscles.”

Triathlons require stamina and endurance leading up to and during the race so it’s important to maintain strength and health. The Electro Muscle Stimulation maximizes your muscle recovery so you can realize all of your fitness goals. It also flushes lactic acid by increasing blood flow to fight against the sensation of heavy legs, keeping you on top of your game. Compex recovery products also help to stimulate your endorphins to deliver pain relief, further relax muscles and even reduce anxiety.

O’Donnell will be competing in the Ironman Kona October 11on a 140.6 mile journey and we wish him all the luck. For the full article, click here.

Score Big this Football Season with Compex

CompexFootball

Whether you’re a football player or a football fan, the season is just about to start. Excitement is already building as the first pre-season games take place and Fantasy leagues are readying to pick their teams. American football is arguably one the most intense, full contact sports out there. Because of the aggressive nature of the game, being in peak physical condition is not only a benefit but also a necessity. If you’re not on the top of your game, someone else will be.

Training and conditioning are not only key for performance but also injury prevention. A full contact sport like football wracks up a number of injuries.  According to the San Francisco Spine Institute, up to 1.5 million men participate in football each year. In addition, there are an estimated 1.2 million football-related injuries per year. Injuries range from minor like sprains to severe like concussions, spinal injuries and broken bones.

So how do you keep your edge while extending your career? By building strength and allowing yourself proper recovery. Compex muscle stimulators can help you do both…and more. Adding Compex to your training program can help you up your game significantly.

Building Strength

Football requires a tremendous amount of strength, regardless of position. For example, if you’re a linebacker, you need to be ready to inflict and withstand hard hits. If you’re a quarterback or a receiver, you need to be able to handle being tackled or break through clusters of players to make a play. Most players look to lifting as a way to build muscle strength. However, when you lift, no matter the weight, there is only so much muscle you can recruit, usually around 30%. By using Compex, you can not only recruit more muscle, but target underutilized muscles as well. Compex mimics the signals your brain sends to your muscles to make them contract, but this allows you target exactly which muscles you want to strengthen. Compex can be used in addition to lifting, instead of lifting or even while you lift to build strength while reducing impact. Since Compex allows you to recruit more muscle to lift, you do not have to lift more weight, reducing the strain on joints and connective tissue.

Increased Muscle Contraction Speed

If you need jump to catch a pass or take off down the field, you need to be able to go in a split second. The faster your muscles contract, the faster your legs are propelled in the direction you want to go. Compex can help increase the speed of muscle contraction, making quick movements even faster. It does this by training your muscles to fire a certain way; the more your muscles do it, the faster they will do it. If you’re a running back or a receiver, this can make a difference in your ability to sprint down the sidelines, maneuver around the defense or catch a pass in the air while under pressure.

Recovery

Recovery is a critical part of a training program. After beating your muscles down, they need time to rebuild. Compex helps you recover by increasing blood flow to your muscles. Increasing blood flow removes waste products that build up from intense physical activity like lactic acid or debris from muscle fibers. With those obstructions removed, fresh blood is moved in to help your muscles heal. Compex can increase that blood flow up to 600% helping speed your recovery time and getting you back on the field faster. In addition, using Compex releases endorphins, making you feel good while your body recovers.

Check out our recommended training program:

compex football training program

 

Compex Recovery Series: Plantar Fasciitis

FootPain

If you feel a sharp pain in your heel when you take your first steps in the morning, you might have a condition called plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is one the most common causes of heel plain and approximately 2 million patients are treated for it every year.

Plantar fasciitis is caused when the plantar fascia, the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot becomes inflamed. The plantar fascia connects your heel bone to your toes and is designed to act like as a shock absorber, supporting the arch in your foot. If tension on it becomes too great, small tears can occur in the fascia. Plantar fasciitis is often common in runners and people who are on their feet for extended periods of time.

If you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis, you’ll notice a stabbing pain after you get out of bed in the morning and begin walking. The pain may subside once you walk around a bit and your foot loosens up, but it may return standing or getting after sitting down for a while or when you go up stairs. If your are experiencing foot pain at night, you may have a different problem. Consult with your doctor as you may have arthritis or tarsal tunnel syndrome, not plantar fasciitis.

There are several additional factors that may increase your risk of developing plantar fasciitis. This condition is most common between the ages of 40 and 60. In addition to runners, risk is increased for dancers, particularly ballet dancers because dance can increases stress on the heel and attached tissue. Dancers may also have high arches, another factor. If your job requires you to be on your feet all day, your risk of plantar fasciitis increases as well.

TREATMENT

Despite it being a painful condition, most people recover from who plantar fasciitis recover in just a few months with treatment. First and foremost, resting and getting off your feet for a while is recommending. The following can also help soothe the symptoms and prevent plantar fasciitis in the future.

Medications

Taking ibuprofen or naproxen, common pain relievers, may ease pain and reduce inflammation.

Stretches

Just like with your Achilles tendon, stretching out your calf muscles can help to reduce the stress on your fascia by allowing more flexibility in your foot.

  • Calf stretch
    • Try leaning forward against a wall with one knee straight and the heel on the ground. Then place the other leg in front, with the knee bent. Push your hips toward the wall in a controlled fashion and old the position for 10 seconds, then relax. Repeat this exercise 20 times for each foot. You should feel a strong pull in the calf during this stretch.
  • Plantar fascia stretch
    • Sit down and cross your affected foot over the knee of your other leg. Grab the toes of your painful foot and slowly pull them toward you in a controlled fashion. If you cannot reach your foot, wrap a towel around your big toe to help pull your toes toward you. Place your other hand along the bottom of our foot. The fascia should feel like a tight band when stretched. Hold the stretch for 10 seconds then release. Repeat it multiple times per foot. For best results, try this exercise in the morning before standing or walking.

Night splints

Just like with the exercises listed above, a split may help stretch your calf and the arch of you foot. Night splints do this for you while you sleep by holding the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon in a lengthened position overnight that helps them stretch out.

Supportive Shoes and Orthotics

Supportive inserts like heel cups or custom arch supports can help reduce pain by increasing foot support and distributing your weight more evenly. Also, wearing worn out running shoes actually increases your risk of plantar fasciitis as well as aggravates it so make sure you are wearing shoes with proper fit and support.

Electric Muscle Stimulation

Using an electric muscle stimulator Compex can also help you recover from plantar fasciitis by breaking up adhesions without impact. Here is how to use your Compex unit to help with recovery:

compex-plantar-fasciitis-recovery

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/plantar-fasciitis/basics/definition/con-20025664

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/plantar-fasciitis-topic-overview

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00149

Compex Recovery Series: Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles Tendon

If you have pain along the back of your leg near your heel, you may have Achilles tendonitis. Achilles tendonitis is an overuse injury that commonly occurs in runners and “weekend warriors”.

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. Named after a tragic hero from Greek mythology, it connects your calf muscle to your heel bone to allow you to jump, run and walk.

Achilles tendonitis is most common in middle-aged men, but it can happen to anyone who has a sudden increase in physical activity. The risk is increased if you also have tight calf muscles and/or a flat arch in your foot. Other risk factors include running in worn out shoes, cold weather, frequently running uphill or if you suffer from medical conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

There are two main types of Achilles tendinitis: insertional and noninsertional. Insertional Achilles tendinitis involves the lower portion of the heel, where the tendon attaches to the heel bone. Noninsertional Achilles tendinitis is when the fibers in the middle portion of the tendon have started to break down with tiny tears, swell, and/or thicken. This type is more often seen in younger, active people. Both types can also cause bone spurs.

Achilles tendonitis should be diagnosed by your doctor. However, if you experienced a sudden “pop” in the back of your calf or heel, this might be something more serious like a ruptured or torn Achilles tendon. If this happens, see your doctor immediately.

RECOVERY AND TREATMENT

More often than not, Achilles tendonitis can be treated without surgery. However, recovery may take a few months. The following will can help you recover and get back in the game.

Rest

Rest is always the most important thing when recovering from an injury. Your body needs a break to heal. While taking time off from exercise is recommended, if you just can’t ditch all physical activities, switch to more low-impact ones while you’re recovering. When resting your Achilles, try biking, swimming or using an elliptical machine until you’re fully healed.

Ice

Icing the injured area of your Achilles tendon throughout the day can help to reduce the swelling and pain. However, try not to ice it for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Medication

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication is recommended to help reduce the swelling and pain associated with Achilles tendonitis. These include such drugs as ibuprofen and naproxen. While they will reduce swelling, the do not reduce the thickening for the tendon. If you find yourself taking these medications for more than a month, speak with your doctor.

Exercise

Exercise might be the cause of Achilles tendonitis, but it can also help prevent it and aid in recovery. The following exercises can help reduce stress on the Achilles tendon:

  • Calf stretch
    • Calf tightness is a contributing factor to Achilles tendonitis. Strengthening and stretching your calf muscles can help. Try leaning forward against a wall with one knee straight and the heel on the ground. Then place the other leg in front, with the knee bent. Push your hips toward the wall in a controlled fashion and old the position for 10 seconds, then relax. Repeat this exercise 20 times for each foot. You should feel a strong pull in the calf during this stretch.
  • Bilateral heel drop
    • Stand at the edge of a stair with just the front half of your foot on the stair. Make sure you have good balance or hold onto a railing if necessary. Lift your heels off the ground then slowly lower your heels as low as you can go while still on the stair. Repeat this step 20 times. This exercise should be done in a slow and controlled manner, as moving too quickly can potentially injury the tendon.

Supportive shoes and orthotics

If you’re experiencing chronic Achilles pain, you may want to invest in supportive shoes or shoe inserts. These can be helpful if your Achilles tendonitis lasts longer than a few months.

Electric muscle stimulation

Electric muscle stimulators are great for helping sore muscles recover. Compex can be used to help relax the muscles, increase blood flood and decrease pain associated with Achilles tendonitis. Take look below to see what programs to use and the best pad placement for relief.

achilles-tendonitis-recovery-with-compex-muscle-stimulators

Sources:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00147

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/achilles-tendinitis/basics/definition/con-20024518

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001072.htm

Debunking the Myths around Compex Muscle Stimulators

NMES Myths

There are many myths, misconceptions and concerns around electric muscle stimulators and rightly so. Using a device that sends an electric current through your body sounds dangerous and painful. But medical devices like the Compex Electric Muscle Stimulator are reviewed and approved by the FDA, designed to perform very specific functions that are mirrored after the body’s own processes and are very safe.

Let’s dive into some of the most common questions and concerns (for a full list of all FAQs, click here).

 

Q: What does a Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulator (NMES) like Compex do?

A: The principle of electrostimulation is very simple; it reproduces the processes that occur when our brain orders muscles to contract. It works almost like a relay race; when we decide to contract a muscle, our brain sends an electrical current down through our nerve fibers. Once it reaches the muscle, the terminal motor neurons fire and stimulate the muscle fibers to contract.

When you use an electric muscle stimulator, the signal is sent directly to the motor neurons using brain-like electrical pulses. In fact, muscles cannot tell the difference between a contraction triggered by the brain and one caused by a NMES device. The difference is that with a NMES device, you bathe the entire length of the motor neurons. The result is a more thorough and complete muscular contraction. There is also less impact on bones and joints since the stimulation is coming from the device and not from an activity such as weight lifting.

 

Q: Are there any side effects when using a NMES device?

A: Side effects are limited; Compex is a very safe device. However, if you are looking to build strength and start off with too high of a setting, you can experience soreness, the same way you would if you work out too hard at the gym. There has also been reports of skin irritation from the pads.

It should also be noted that improper use of a muscle stimulation unit can easily lead to skin burns, according to research published in “The Journal of Arthroplasty” in 2005. Dr. Daryl Lawson states that if a strong electrical current is delivered through a small electrode, the skin is exposed to a higher concentration of electricity per unit of area, which can cause burns. Again, start off slow and figure out what levels are best for you and that you’re most comfortable with.

 

Q: What about other NMES devices that claim they can help you lose weight? Some claim to give you six-pack abs!

A: While a NMES device may be able to strengthen, tone or firm a muscle, no NMES devices have been cleared at this time specifically for weight loss, girth reduction, or “six pack abs”. Both the FDA and FTC have cracked down on companies making false claims about their NMES products.

Using these devices alone will not give you “six-pack” abs. Stimulating muscles repeatedly with electricity will result in muscles that are strengthened and toned to some extent but will not, based on currently available data, create a major change in your appearance without the addition of diet and regular exercise.

However, in a study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, there was a marked increase in their caloric output from using Compex. Because of their condition, regular exercise was not an option. While Compex does not entirely replace exercise, for patients who cannot engage in more strenuous activity, Compex can be used to strengthen muscle, increase definition and muscle size, and increase caloric output.

 

Q: Does using a NMES device give you an unfair advantage?

A: Not anymore than having a dedicated training and recovery program does. While the use of Compex has been proven to increase performance, it does so by increasing muscle actions that the body already performs during a workout. The difference is that they are much more targeted and allow for more muscle contraction of specific muscle groups and muscle fiber types. The body can’t tell if the signals for a contraction are from the brain or Compex. Compex stimulates the entire nerve vs. just part of it.

 

Q: Are there any sports currently banning / restricting their use?

A: At this time, the use of NMES devices has not been banned or restricted.

 

Q: Is the use of a NMES device a “quick fix? How soon will I see results?

A: Depends on your definition of “quick fix”. While the effects of recovery are felt instantly, using Compex to build muscle doesn’t happen instantly.

If you are using Compex for building strength, expect to start to feel and see results in 2-3 weeks. If you are looking to use Compex to increase the amount of enzymes needed to deliver energy for contracting muscle, it will take about 6 weeks. If you are using Compex to increase tone, you should see results in about 3-4 weeks.

 

Q: What if you only use NMES without exercising?

A: Even without exercise, NMES devices will strengthen your muscles. However, you will not receive the added benefits of an exercise program such as cardiovascular health. It is recommended that a NMES device be included as part of your overall health or fitness plan.

 

Q: Are there any side effects when using a NMES device?

A: Side effects are limited; Compex is a very safe device. However, if you are looking to build strength and start off with too high of a setting, you can experience soreness, the same way you would if you work out too hard at the gym. There has also been reports of skin irritation from the pads.

It should also be noted that improper use of a muscle stimulation unit can easily lead to skin burns, according to research published in “The Journal of Arthroplasty” in 2005. Dr. Daryl Lawson states that if a strong electrical current is delivered through a small electrode, the skin is exposed to a higher concentration of electricity per unit of area, which can cause burns. Again, start off slow and figure out what levels are best for you and that you’re most comfortable with.

 

Q: What parts of the body is NMES most effective on? Is there anywhere on the body where I shouldn’t use an NMES?

A: NMES units can be used on almost all parts of the body. However, stimulation should not be applied on the neck. A severe spasm of the muscles may occur and the contractions may be strong enough to close the airway or cause difficulty in breathing. In addition, stimulation on the neck could also have adverse effects on the heart rhythm or blood pressure.

The effects of stimulation of the brain are unknown. Therefore, stimulation should not be applied across the head and electrodes should not be placed on opposite sides of the head.

Electrodes used for electrical stimulation should not be applied across the chest because the introduction of electrical current into the chest may cause rhythm disturbances to the heart.

While we are discussing the chest, you should use caution when using a NMES if you have an implanted pacemaker. Implanted pacemakers and heart defibrillators can mistake EMI from the electrical muscle stimulator for a physiological signal coming from the body itself. This causes the devices to respond to the signal — pacemakers do so by changing their rate, and implanted defibrillators may deliver an unnecessary shock.

In addition, do not use Compex if you have the following medical conditions:

  • Epilepsy
  • Following acute trauma or fracture
  • Following recent surgical procedures
  • Critical ischemia of lower limbs
  • Abdominal or inguinal hernia
  • Cancerous lesions

 

Q: What sports tend to be benefit the most from NMES? Is it just for athletes?

A:  NMES units are for anyone looking to build strength, increase performance, or recover faster. You do not have to be an athlete; NMES units are recommended for anyone looking to achieve their fitness goals.

Compex is recommended for anyone participating in a sport that requires strength like lifting, endurance like triathlons, or anyone in a competitive sports league that needs to speed up recovery time between games or matches.

 

Q: Is there a particular age group that benefits the most from NMES?

A:  Compex has been used for children as young as 10 years old; however not without adult supervision. Compex can be used by young people for recovery but also to build strength. In some ways, it is safer than the weight room because there is no pressure placed on growth plates, bones or joints.

 

Q: Are NMES systems are really expensive?

A: No. Depending on which model you choose, they are relatively affordable. Compex models start at $399.99 USD.

 

Q: Can you use a NMES device everyday?

A: Yes, but remember with any training program, recovery is an important part of the process. Luckily Compex can be used for both training and recovery depending on setting.

 

Q: What is the difference between Compex Muscle Stimulators and ones used for medical purposes like muscle re education, physical therapy or to prevent venous thrombosis?

A: There are a lot of different types of electrical stimulators that stimulate nerves. Physical therapists often use one called Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation or TENS. TENS units use a different kind of wave / frequency that stimulates sensory nerves instead of motor nerves like Compex. TENS units work with sensory nerves to block pain. When using a TENS device, you’ll feel a buzzing but no contraction of the muscle.

Compex is a NMES: Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulator. Compex works on a “all or nothing” principle. Once the motor neuron fires, the muscle fibers that it innervates will contract. The nerve cell and the muscle fibers it innervates is called a motor unit. One nerve cell will innervate anywhere from 10 to 1000 muscle fibers depending on the muscle fiber types, e.g. slow twitch vs. fast twitch. Either all of the motor unit fires, or none of it does. The strength of a contraction is determined by how many motor units fire synchronously.

When the pulse is sent, you will feel a twitch, a variety of twitches or very short contractions when running warm up or recovery programs. This type of response is common in the MarcPro unit, which is for recovery only. Compex not only delivers the recovery twitches, but also delivers twitches to warm the muscle up before an activity. On top of that, Compex has as many as four programs that contract the muscle for seconds at a time; enough so that when repeated throughout the length of a program, increased strength is developed after 10 sessions.

When you compare Compex with other similar products, the technology is the same, but the range of frequencies is different. Compex has 4 circuits. What that means is that four different muscle groups can be stimulated at the same time. A lot of muscle can be covered each time a program is run.

The muscle is the conduit for the current. At the proper frequency and pulse duration, it will stimulate motor nerves and only motor nerves. The Compex can be very powerful – more powerful than other popular NMES devices. It has the ability to penetrate deeply to contract more muscle than can be achieved with a maximum voluntary contraction. When the current penetrates more deeply, you stimulate more motor nerves and more muscle fibers. However, you choose the degree to which the muscle contracts. The stimulation levels are finely graded so you can select the exact level of current you want based on your comfort level.

Compex delivers a biphasic square wave of electricity. What that means is instead of a gradual build up, the current comes almost instantly so the nerve does not accommodate or hesitate. It sounds like it would be more painful this way however, this type of wave is actually more comfortable. Without the hesitation, the nerve and muscle fibers are stimulated at a lower level of energy.

 

Do you have more questions about Compex or electric muscle stimulators in general? Please ask away in the comments!

 

Sources:

http://www.shopcompex.com/training/warnings

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=20437&page=2

http://www.medword.com/MedwordStore/PCP/EMS_truth.html

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/HomeHealthandConsumer/ConsumerProducts/ucm142478.htm

http://www.livestrong.com/article/37127-electrical-muscle-stimulation-work/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/153338-muscle-stimulation-dangers/

http://www.activeforever.com/electronic-muscle-stimulators

http://www.acefitness.org/pressroom/256/electrical-muscle-stimulation-ems-claims-exposed/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_muscle_stimulation

How Compex Muscle Stimulators Help Ankle Sprain Recovery

Ankle Sprain Treatment

Ankle sprains are a common injury across many sports. They can even occur from doing everyday activities; it just takes one misstep.

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, 25,000 Americans turn an ankle every day which equals about 9 million sprained ankles a year. Sprains are common in more extreme athletic activities such as functional fitness and marathon running and can impact strict training programs and preparation for competition.

The treatment of a sprain depends on the level of injury. Orthopedists divide ankle sprains into grades I through III. Grade I is a minor twist. Often this type of sprain is addressed with the RICE method: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Grade II means that there was some tearing and longer recovery time. Grade III indicates a major rupture or even minor fractures and may require surgery to repair. Make sure if you are experiencing any symptoms of a sprain that you visit your doctor to determine the degree of injury.

The best way to avoid ankle sprains and damage caused by them is to strengthen the ankle and if a sprain should occur, allow yourself the proper recovery time.

Recovering from an Ankle Sprain

There are several small things that you can do to help recover from a sprain (depending on the severity and what treatment plan has been prescribed to you by a licensed medical professional):

  • When you get a sprain, treat it with the RICE method mentioned above.
    • Ideally, once at rest, ice your ankle for 20 minutes at a time. Elevate your ankle above your heart to prevent fluid accumulation. Active recommends doing this for 2 consecutive days, icing the joint every 2 hours for 20 minutes at a time.
  • Keep the ankle mobile / work on ankle mobility
    • When ankle ligaments heal, they can form scars. Scar tissue is tighter than regular tissue and can make you more susceptible to sprains in the future. While your ankle is elevated, pretend you are writing with your big toe, moving your ankle around as you air-write.
  • Do simple exercises to strengthen your ankle while it heals
    • Achilles stretches 3x a day: Lie on your back, take a towel and loop it around your toes. Pull the ends of the towel, moving your toes upwards. You should feel a slight stretch in your ankle.
    • Balance on the injured ankle for 2-3 minutes at a time. This helps strengthen ligaments in your ankle. Feeling daring? Try balancing with and throwing a tennis ball against the wall.
  • Compex Electronic Muscle Stimulators can help to strengthen your ankle and aid in recovery:

compex-injury-recovery

Sources

http://www.active.com/fitness/articles/4-ways-to-save-yourself-from-a-sprained-ankle

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445097/

http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-treatment/owners-manual-not-just-ankle-sprain?page=single

http://www.triradar.com/training-advice/triathlon-injuries-guide/#ixzz35VdS5j54

Read what Olympic Silver Medalist and Ironman World Champion says about Compex…

Active Recovery!
Active Recovery!

Active Recovery & Compex

 I get asked the following question quite frequently…” How have you been able to race so long?” Well if only I knew the answer to that..LOL… But  here is a try at answering it.

 

 

 

For one I really do love what I do. Triathlon is one of the hardest sports to train for. It is very hard to master just one and Triathetes have to master 3 sports.So just when you think you have figured it out there is always something new to master. I am also a huge believer in making sure you recover properly from your workouts. I often tell the other athletes that I coach that Rest is training as well. Yes it is OK to take a day off put the feet up and feel what is like to be like everyone else. Thanks goodness you get to train again tomorrow.

Finally it is the extra little things that really count. For instance I am a firm believer in Massage, ART and my Compex. I must admit I love my Compex the most. I can use it any where whether I am sitting on the couch watching TV, in the car traveling to a race or even laying in bed. Its the easiest form of training. Why? Because you really don’t have to do anything. Can’t think of anything easier than that. Place the pads in the desired areas and I am ready to go.

Michellie Jones

I’m a long time user and believer in Compex. It’s significantly enhanced my ability to train, race and stay healthy. My workout sessions are much more efficient because I can push harder and recover quicker.”

 

Compex works for me…Olympic Silver Medalist Michellie Jones


Michellie Jones, 2000 Olympic Triathlon Silver Medalist, 2006 Ironman World Champion
Michellie Jones, 2000 Olympic Triathlon Silver Medalist, 2006 Ironman World Champion

“I’m a long time user and believer in Compex. It’s significantly enhanced my ability to train, race and stay healthy. My workout sessions are much more efficient because I can push harder and recover quicker.”

Michellie Jones, 2000 Olympic Triathlon Silver Medalist, 2006 Ironman World Champion

See why other professional athletes say “Compex Works for Me” >
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